Why did Mark Twain hate the concept of imperialism?

Mark Twain hated the concept of imperialism because it was based on hypocrisy and domination. He found imperialism's true goal of conquest as contrary to American ideals of democracy.

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Mark Twain hated the concept of imperialism because he realized it was based on hypocrisy and domination, two ways of being he abhorred. As he explains in his essay "To the Person Sitting in Darkness," the American project in the Philippines was to conquer and exploit the country, not free it as one might expect a democratic nation to do.

All through Twain's oeuvre, he takes what is called the subaltern perspective, or the "view from below." He sees imperialism through the eyes of the conquered, not the conquerors, just as he tries, if not always successfully, to envision slavery through the eyes of the slave and not the slaveholder. As an empathic person, he hated to see others suffer for the benefit of the greed of a few.

As he explains in his essay, if the US truly is the beacon of democracy that other nations look up to, it should behave like one by freeing the Philippines and helping it to establish a truly democratic government.

His attitude toward American imperialist policy is...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 878 words.)

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