Why did Lyddie hesitate to go through the gate of Cutler's Tavern?

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The part of the story that the question is asking about is the very beginning of Chapter 3. Luke has just dropped Lyddie off at Cutler's Tavern, and Lyddie just stands there outside of the gate. It's a great moment in the story because it is one of the few...

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The part of the story that the question is asking about is the very beginning of Chapter 3. Luke has just dropped Lyddie off at Cutler's Tavern, and Lyddie just stands there outside of the gate. It's a great moment in the story because it is one of the few times that readers get to see Lyddie not taking action. I believe that Lyddie hesitates outside of the gate for two reasons.  

First, Lyddie is hesitant to enter the gate and Cutler's Tavern because she is intimidated. The place is huge. It's much larger than anything else that Lyddie has ever seen as this point in her life.  

Second, Lyddie knows that she is giving up her independence the moment that she walks into that tavern. During the previous winter, Lyddie and her brother had been in charge of themselves and the house; however, that house has been sold, and Lyddie has been turned into an indentured servant at the tavern. Lyddie is a fiercely independent character, and she knows that is gone once she steps through that gate. That scares her.  

Once I walk in that gate, I ain't free anymore, she thought. No matter how handsome the house, once I enter I'm a servant girl—no more than a black slave. She had been queen of the cabin...up there on the hill. But now someone else would call the tune. 

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