Why did Lucy feel comfortable in the faun's cave?

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In chapter two of C.S. Lewis' The Lion, the Witch and the WardrobeLucy meets Tumnus, a faun who is in the service of the evil White Witch. In this chapter, Lucy shows her trustingness and naivety by visiting the home of a stranger.

The faun's home is delightful....

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In chapter two of C.S. Lewis' The Lion, the Witch and the WardrobeLucy meets Tumnus, a faun who is in the service of the evil White Witch. In this chapter, Lucy shows her trustingness and naivety by visiting the home of a stranger.

The faun's home is delightful. The text says that "Lucy thought she had never been in a nicer place." It is a little cave with just two rooms: a sitting room and a bedroom. The cave has a carpet on the floor, two little chairs, a table, a dresser, a fireplace with a mantlepiece, and a shelf full of books. This home is cozy and cheery.

Though Tumnus is a spy for the queen, he is a very good and kind fellow. After Lucy becomes queen, she and Tumnus remain friends for the rest of her reign. He serves a simply wonderful tea with an egg, sardines on toast, buttered toast, toast with honey, and a sugar-topped cake. He tells Lucy stories of what life in Narnia is like and plays her music on his flute.

The plot to hand Lucy over to the queen reveals how wrong Lucy was to trust a stranger, but the joy that she enjoys in this cave demonstrates the childlike wonder that Lucy experiences as she explores this new land.

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In the book of The Chronicles of Narnia called The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis, Lucy walks through the back of a wardrobe in the house of an old Professor and finds herself in the land of Narnia. There she meets a faun named Tumnus, who invites her to his cave for tea. Lucy feels comfortable in the cave of Tumnus for several reasons.

First of all, Tumnus is very polite and always speaks kindly. Lucy has no idea, of course, that he has been employed by the White Witch to lull her to sleep so that she can be captured. She sees him only as a charming and magical host. In the woods, he shares his umbrella and walks arm in arm with her. He does everything he can to be ingratiating.

Secondly, Lucy finds the cave attractive and comfortable. Lewis writes, "Lucy thought she had never been in a nicer place." The cave is dry and clean. It has a carpet on the floor, a fireplace, a shelf full of interesting books, and two chairs and a table where Lucy and Tumnus can sit together.

Additionally, Tumnus plays the part of a generous host and serves Lucy all sorts of snacks along with the tea. These include eggs, sardines on toast, toast with butter and honey, and a sugar-topped cake.

Tumnus also makes Lucy feel at ease by telling her tales of nymphs, dryads, and other inhabitants of the forest. Finally, he plays a flute that is intended to charm her and send her to sleep. Eventually Lucy impresses Tumnus as well, and so he tells her about the White Witch's plot and helps her escape.

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