Why did Jack paint his face in Lord of the Flies?

Jack painted his face in Lord of the Flies in order to be camouflaged better while hunting pigs. His mask later becomes a symbol of his quest for power and the loss of his humanity.

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Jack Merridew's primary goal is to be the unequivocal leader of the group of stranded boys. He is power-hungry and determined to be in control. Fearmongering is also part of Jack's strategy, which is why he plays up the story of the so-called "beast" to frighten the younger boys.

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Jack Merridew's primary goal is to be the unequivocal leader of the group of stranded boys. He is power-hungry and determined to be in control. Fearmongering is also part of Jack's strategy, which is why he plays up the story of the so-called "beast" to frighten the younger boys.

The reason Jack paints his face is linked to all of these factors. His initial motivation is to achieve better camouflage while hunting pigs after deducing that his efforts have been hampered by his inability to hide. His mask of paint, however, became a symbolic representation of his quest for power and the loss of his humanity.

Of all the children trapped on the island, Jack is arguably the one who loses his humanity the most. His face paint allows him to create a kind of barrier between who he used to be and who he is becoming. If showing one's face is considered "normal" and indicative of societal convention, then Jack's mask is a symbol of him embracing his barbaric leanings.

Jack's camouflage also provides a valuable way for him to hide from the other boys when he wants to. Being hidden keeps him in control, enables him to easily evoke fear, and keeps the power firmly in his hands.

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