Why did the German soldiers come to the Johansens' apartment looking for the Rosens?

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In Number the Stars , every aspect of life in Copenhagen has been taken over by Nazi occupation. Young Annemarie Johansen spends most of her time with her best friend Ellen, who is posing as Annemarie's recently deceased sister Else, despite being only half the age that Else was when...

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In Number the Stars, every aspect of life in Copenhagen has been taken over by Nazi occupation. Young Annemarie Johansen spends most of her time with her best friend Ellen, who is posing as Annemarie's recently deceased sister Else, despite being only half the age that Else was when she died. Ellen's family has already fled the country, but the opportunity to get Ellen herself out has not yet presented itself.

In one terrifying instance, the German soldiers come to the Johansen's apartment in the very early hours of the morning looking for the Rosens, Ellen's family. The Nazi's know that the Johansens and the Rosens are friends and become suspicious when they see that Ellen has brown hair while the rest of the Johansens are blonde. Luckily, Mr. Johansen has a baby picture of Else in which she has brown hair and shows it to the soldiers, convincing them to leave.

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In Lois Lowry's book Number the Stars, the Johansens are a family living in Nazi-occupied Copenhagen, Denmark. For a while, they have to pretend that their daughter Annemarie's young friend, Ellen Rosen, is actually their recently deceased daughter Lise in order to stop her from being captured by Nazi soldiers. Eventually, Ellen and her family, along with other Danish Jews, are safely smuggled to Sweden, which was a neutral country in World War II.

Annemarie and her family have many scary run-ins with Nazi soldiers throughout the book. Probably the scariest is when Nazi soldiers come to the Johansen's apartment in the middle of the night looking for the Rosens— they believe that the Johansens are hiding the entire Rosen family. These soldiers have begun rounding up the Jewish people of Denmark in order to "relocate" them to some unknown place, and the Rosens are on their list. Luckily, Ellen is the only one there, and Mr. Johansen is able to convince the soldiers that Ellen is his daughter, Lise.

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