Why did France and Britain fight in the French and Indian War? 

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Let's focus our discussion on the French and Indian War.

The French and the British were involved in a worldwide conflict from 1756-1763. This conflict was known as the Seven Years War. The part of the Seven Years War that was fought in North America was called the French and...

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Let's focus our discussion on the French and Indian War.

The French and the British were involved in a worldwide conflict from 1756-1763. This conflict was known as the Seven Years War. The part of the Seven Years War that was fought in North America was called the French and Indian War. The French and many Native American tribes fought against Great Britain.

The French and Indian War was fought for a few reasons. One reason was for control of the lucrative fur trade in the Ohio Valley. The French had established a firm control over this trade with the Native Americans. As the British began to expand their settlements in North America, the French became concerned that the British were going to try to take away or reduce the fur trade that France had with the Native Americans.

Another reason was for control of land. Both Great Britain and France were rivals. If one country could win the war, they would become stronger at the expense of their rival. The winner of this war would likely get land from the country that lost the war. After the French and Indian war ended, the British got much land from France. Great Britain got all of France’s land east of the Mississippi River except for New Orleans. As a result, France was out of North America, which was a positive development for France’s rivals, Britain and Spain.

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