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Why did Filipinos fights against Spanish rule? How long had Spain controlled the Philippines?

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The Spanish history of colonization in the Philippines began in 1521 with the arrival of Ferdinand Magellan. The explorer immediately went about forming alliances on the island and attempted to establish a Spanish presence there. This attempt ultimately failed, but it put the islands in the sights of Spanish imperialists....

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The Spanish history of colonization in the Philippines began in 1521 with the arrival of Ferdinand Magellan. The explorer immediately went about forming alliances on the island and attempted to establish a Spanish presence there. This attempt ultimately failed, but it put the islands in the sights of Spanish imperialists. In 1564, an expedition of 500 Spaniards conquered Cebu, establishing the first permanent Spanish presence in the archipelago. Spanish imperialism continued throughout the Philippines and by 1571, all of the islands were under Spanish control.

Throughout the following three centuries, there were a number of unsuccessful uprisings against Spanish rule. These were often in response to harsh policies of repression and forced labor inflicted on the Filipinos by the Spanish. Land was also commonly seized from the native Filipinos for use by the Spanish and a heavy tribute system was strictly enforced. There was also a strong desire among many Filipinos to abandon Spanish imposed Catholicism and return to their older animist religions. These rebellions were always brutally crushed, but the desire for independence did not disappear entirely.

The origins of the ultimate Filipino revolt and victory against Spain are often linked to the construction of the Suez canal in 1869. With the opening of this trade route, many Filipino sailors and merchants traveled to Europe where they were influenced by ideas of liberty and self-rule. In 1872, a short-lived rebellion broke out in the province of Cavite. While the revolt was unsuccessful, it did sow the seeds for further uprisings.

In 1892, sensing the weakness of the Spanish Empire, an organization of Filipino nationalists was created in Cavite with the goal of expelling the Spanish once and for all from the islands. In 1896, this group began its revolt in the capital of Manila. The fight for independence spread throughout the Philippines leading to many Filipino victories. In 1898, at the outset of the Spanish American War, the Philippines declared independence from Spain.

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Spain had controlled the Philippines, legally at least, ever since Magellan "discovered" the chain of islands in 1521.  Actual colonization of the islands started in 1565.  By 1571, the Spaniards had reached Luzon (the northernmost and now main island of the country).  There, they set up Manila which is now the capital.

The Filipinos fought Spanish rule late in the 1800s.  They did this because they had heard of the rebellions against Spanish rule in Latin America and because they were influenced by Enlightenment ideas that people should govern themselves.

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