Why did Delphine want to read the Black Panther newspaper?

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While the other kids at the center are playing, Delphine and Fern volunteer to help out Sister Mukumbu with some classroom chores. One of these chores involves counting and stacking Black Panther newspapers. As she goes about her task, Delphine starts skimming the headlines. As she does so, she notices...

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While the other kids at the center are playing, Delphine and Fern volunteer to help out Sister Mukumbu with some classroom chores. One of these chores involves counting and stacking Black Panther newspapers. As she goes about her task, Delphine starts skimming the headlines. As she does so, she notices that the newspapers contain quite a few photos of Huey Newton, one of the co-founders of the Black Panther Party. It seems that his face is everywhere.

At that moment, Delphine remembers that Big Ma doesn't have much time for Huey Newton; she regards him as nothing more than a common criminal who belongs in jail. Delphine, however, has long since started to think for herself, and, in her mind at least, Newton looks kind of cool and revolutionary. To her, he's a hero, not a criminal.

As well as photos of Huey Newton, the Black Panther newspaper also contains an article on the late Lil' Bobby, a young man killed in a shootout with the police. Since his untimely death, he's been held up by the Black Panthers as one of the movement's martyrs. Delphine finds the article so incredibly engrossing that she stops what she's doing and buys a paper to read.

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