Why do they destroy Old Misery's house in "The Destructors" by Graham Greene? 

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The destruction of Old Misery's house arises from the amorality of the years following the bombing and destruction of London.

Trevor, whose father was once an architect and who has "come down in the world," destroys the ancient house, not with any mob mentality, but with great creativity and organization. His destruction is brilliant, albeit misguided. That he is able to have the house still standing after major walls and struts have been removed is testimony to his genius. It is a ingenious act of revenge against the upper class--this is why the lorry driver enjoys so the toppling of the ancient house when he discovers that it has been connected to his vehicle.
The upper class is represented by the old gentleman, whose name is Thomas, and who once had been a builder: "He lived alone in the crippled house, doing for himself...." And, yet, Trevor retains some of the ethics of his class as the boys do not steal anything.

Graham Greene himself once said, "Destruction, after all, is a form of...

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