Why is the costume chosen by the count an example of irony in The Count of Monte Cristo?

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It would be helpful to know which costume it is that you are asking about, but if it is his main character, the answer is rather straight forward.  His enemy and the one who betrayed him, Fernand Mondego, has assumed the title of Count by absolutely dubious means.  His lust...

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It would be helpful to know which costume it is that you are asking about, but if it is his main character, the answer is rather straight forward.  His enemy and the one who betrayed him, Fernand Mondego, has assumed the title of Count by absolutely dubious means.  His lust for power and position drove him to betray his best friend (helped along by a heaping helping of jealous about Mercedes) and so this decision by Edward to assume the role of a "count" is clearly to show that he can be everything that Fernand wished he could be.  Of course it also helps him in moving through the world of power and intrigue to have such a title, and so it is useful in the plot as well.

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