Why does Cormac McCarthy not add punctuation and other grammatical structures in "The Road"?

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By not including punctuation and other grammatical structures, Cormac McCarthy creates a narrative that is starkly bare, stripped to nothingness like the novel's setting.  By choosing this style for his writing, McCarthy is employing an additional vehicle, besides the content he presents, by which to communicate to the reader the emptiness of...

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By not including punctuation and other grammatical structures, Cormac McCarthy creates a narrative that is starkly bare, stripped to nothingness like the novel's setting.  By choosing this style for his writing, McCarthy is employing an additional vehicle, besides the content he presents, by which to communicate to the reader the emptiness of the world after the cataclysmic event that for all intents and purposes destroyed it.

It is a testimony to the authors tremendous talent that, despite his use of the bare minimum in writing his story, he is able to convey the deep love that exists between the two main characters.  Through the use of the simple, unembellished statements and questions that make up their interaction and conversation, McCarthy gives the reader a clear sense of the undying tenderness and devotion that lives and grows between father and son in the face of impossible odds.

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