Why are collaborators or informers often objects of hatred and fear?

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mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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Using the novel,  Farewell to Manzanar, collaborators or informers are objects of hatred and fear for good reasons.  In World War II, informers turned in their neighbors for simple things and as a result, the neighbors would lose their homes or businesses to the informers or other collaborators.  Farewell to Manzanar is the story of how the US government treated our Japanese-American citizens during World War II with absolutely no evidence of any of our citizens betraying America in any way. In fact, many Japanese-Americans fought FOR America against Japan.  In the close confines of the camps where we kept these citizens, someone informing untruthfully on a family could destroy any sense of safety.  In having to leave behind their homes and businesses when ordered to live in a camp, these citizens lost both their homes and businesses.  So, considering what damage an informer could do to them, it is understandable that collaborators and informers were regarded with fear and hatred. 

 

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