In Julius Caesar, why is Cassius' death more honorable than that of Brutus?My teacher is making me write about why Cassius is a more honorable than Brutus, but I can not find any reasons. I need...

In Julius Caesar, why is Cassius' death more honorable than that of Brutus?

My teacher is making me write about why Cassius is a more honorable than Brutus, but I can not find any reasons. I need three reasons.

Expert Answers
shakespeareguru eNotes educator| Certified Educator

You seem to have a couple levels of questioning here -- In the main question, you ask about Cassius' death, but then you say you need three reasons that Cassius is more honorable (throughout the play?) than Brutus.  I agree that it is hard to find support for the notion that Cassius is more honorable than Brutus, but, at the end of the play, just before his death, Cassius does seem to redeem himself.  So, let's look at a few reasons that Cassius could be considered honorable at the moment of his death.

First, even though all his troops have deserted him in retreat in Act V, scene iii, he decides that he will not follow them and run away from his position.  There is honor in that choice.

Second, Cassius fulfills his promise to Pindarus by promising that he shall be free, if he will assist in Cassius' suicide.  This is an honorable gesture.

And third, he fulfills his promise to Brutus, that he will die by his own hand rather than be taken.  This sort of suicide might seem cowardly to us today, but it was quite a gesture of honor and dignity in the ancient world.

I am not sure that these honorable actions make him more honorable than Brutus, but they certainly redeem some of the less than honorable actions of Cassius earlier in the play.

 

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Julius Caesar

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