Why does carbon form multiple bonds with oxygen while silicon does not?

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Actually, Silicon does!  Carbon can form various molecules with oxygen, depending upon the number of bonds.  For a single bond, carbon monoxide (CO) is formed; for a double bond, carbon dioxide (CO2) is formed, and even carbon trioxide (CO3) can form with a triple bond, although it is unstable.  Similarly,...

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Actually, Silicon does!  Carbon can form various molecules with oxygen, depending upon the number of bonds.  For a single bond, carbon monoxide (CO) is formed; for a double bond, carbon dioxide (CO2) is formed, and even carbon trioxide (CO3) can form with a triple bond, although it is unstable.  Similarly, Silicon can form the same analogues as carbon -- Silicon oxide (one bond -- SiO) silicon dioxide (two bonds -- SiO2) and silicon trioxide (three bonds -- SiO3.)

It's not surprising Silicon can form similar compounds to Carbon, as it is in the same family in the Periodic Table, Silicon being right below Carbon.  However, carbon compounds are more stable, since the carbon bonding allows for the atoms of carbon and oxygen to be closer and held more firmly that those of silicon.  Because it is a bigger atom and there are more shielding effects by the electrons, the bonds between atoms with silicon are not as strong.

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