Why are the pigs in Animal Farm bad leaders?

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In the interest of nuance, it's important to note that, while the pigs hold a position of leadership within the farm, they're not entirely a unified bloc. Indeed, a major theme in the early part of Animal Farmis the conflict between Snowball and Napoleon for control of the farm....

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In the interest of nuance, it's important to note that, while the pigs hold a position of leadership within the farm, they're not entirely a unified bloc. Indeed, a major theme in the early part of Animal Farm is the conflict between Snowball and Napoleon for control of the farm. Snowball himself, as Napoleon's great opponent, is depicted as courageous (given his exploits in the Battle of the Cowshed) and, by all accounts, appears well intentioned. To this we must add the example of Major himself, the founder of Animalism, with his ideals of animal equality. Looking beyond the major personalities, you have the additional example of the four young pigs who raise opposition to Napoleon's dictatorial ambitions, only to be forcibly silenced and eventually executed, representing the purges in Stalinist Russia. That being said, even from early in the book, we see the presence of corruption among the pigs, and their subversion of animalist principle. Consider the ending of chapter 2, with the disappearance of the milk.

That being said, taken collectively, the pigs can be understood as representing the Communist Party leaders and Bolshevik elites, with Napoleon himself representing Stalin. We have across the course of Animal Farm themes of corruption (memorably expressed through the pigs' taking on of increasingly anthropomorphic characteristics) as well as of misinformation and propaganda, along with dictatorship and the use of suppression. In all these respects, the pigs represent a betrayal of the Revolution's principles. Taken in the context of Orwell's allegory, they represent a powerful indictment, first of the Bolsheviks and then (through Napoleon and his collaborators) of the Stalinist regime.

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The pigs are bad leaders because they're only in it for themselves. Although they claim to be putting Old Major's animalist ideas into practice, in actual fact they're entirely self-serving. For them, power isn't something to be used to improve the lives of the other animals; it's to be used—or rather, abused—to make life easier and more comfortable for the rulers.

Under Napoleon's increasingly violent dictatorship the pigs gradually change the Seven Commandments of Animalism for their own benefit, to justify their despotic rule and to give them the opportunity to lead selfish lives.

Ultimately, the pigs are no better as leaders than Mr. Jones the farmer; though at least Mr. Jones was simply an incompetent drunk. The pigs, on the other hand, are actively and deliberately cruel. To a large extent this is because they regard themselves as a class apart from the other animals in what is supposed to be a classless society. The pigs believe that they are more intelligent, more hard-working than the other animals. And because they see themselves as superior they are unable and unwilling to build a system that will be to the benefit of all.

No wonder that, by the end of the story, it's become impossible to tell the pigs apart from the humans with whom they do business.

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The pigs on Animal Farm are initially relatively good leaders at the beginning of the novella. They expand upon old Major's teachings and develop the system of Animalism. Under Snowball's guidance, the animals become organized and successfully harvest the crops from the farm. Committees are established, and the animals' needs and desires are initially addressed. However, the pigs refuse to engage in any form of physical labor and begin consuming the best products of the farm. Eventually, Napoleon usurps power and tyrannically rules over the farm. The pigs become the favored animals and follow Napoleon's lead. They eventually break every Commandment and live luxurious lives as the most privileged animals on the farm. The pigs, particularly Napoleon, are considered bad leaders because they manipulate the animals through false propaganda, and threaten them with violence. They view the other animals with contempt and restrict them from having the same privileges they enjoy. The pigs only educate other pigs, live in the farmhouse, eat the best foods, and make all the decisions. They force the other animals to work long hours and harm anyone who disagrees with Napoleon's decisions. Overall, the pigs are the ruling elite, who take advantage of the other animals on the farm and prevent them from living fulfilling, satisfying lives.

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Animal Farm's pigs are bad leaders for a variety of reasons; all of which reflect the terrible nature of humanity or Mr. Jones to a worse degree.

1. The pigs lie to the rest of the animals. Many leaders lie for the best interest of the people, but this lying is for the betterment of the pigs. They lie about rations, about productivity, and about what happens to some of the other animals friends (like Boxer). The reason they lie is so that they can have more for themselves.

2. The adopt the problems of Man like drunkenness, slothfulness, and manipulation. The pigs used the extra money they made due to the work of all the other animals to purchase liquor.

3. The pigs change the rules to fit their own comfort and needs. They chose to educate only their young. They chose to alter the rules so that they could live in the human house, and be more equal than the other animals.

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