Why do you think The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins with a reference to Twain’s previous novel (The Adventures of Tom Sawyer) and Mark Twain himself as a “mainly truthful” author?  How does this affect your initial impression of the novel, and of Huck Finn as a narrator?

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins with a reference to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in order to acknowledge that the character of Huck (as well as the characters of Aunty Polly, Mary, and Widow Douglas) may be one that the reader is already familiar with if he or she has read Mark Twain's previous work. This allows Twain to drop the reader in media res, or "in the middle of things." We are quickly able to ascertain Huck's backstory without chapters of exposition . This...

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