Who would be a good character who could be the speaker of a monologue from the book "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.I would like a reasonable character from the book 'Of Mice and Men' about...

Who would be a good character who could be the speaker of a monologue from the book "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.

I would like a reasonable character from the book 'Of Mice and Men' about whom I could talk as (the first person).  I'm really struggling to start off my monolgue as either, I don't know how to write my monologue based upon a character, or who to write it about.

Asked on by pwincesh

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hadley818's profile pic

hadley818 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I think Curley's Wife would be an interesting character to speak a monologue. She is so lonely and such an outsider on a ranch where she feels she doesn't belong. She shares some of these feelings with Lennie before he kills her, but it would be interesting to see a fleshed out monologue that reveals more about how she really feels and what her plans are for the future. You could include some details about her relationship with Curley since we don't see much of that in the book.

copelmat's profile pic

copelmat | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

Another interesting possibility would be to explore the story through the voice of Candy. In many ways, Candy represents many of the same characteristics of both George and Lennie. He possesses George’s compassion and sense of obligation but also Lennie’s disability and status as an outsider.

Because of his age and his years on the ranch, Candy possesses a great deal of wisdom and perspective on its inner-workings—both as a ranch hand as a kind of outsider after the loss of his arm. In this way represents many of the qualities of a good narrator; he has the inside knowledge to tell the story, but also the perspective of the outsider who can also provide more objective commentary.

 

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Viewed as the truly heroic character of "Of Mice and Men," Slim, with his "God-like eyes" is perspicacious and understanding:

His ear heard more than was said to him, and his slow speech had overtones not of thought, but of understanding beyond thought.

Intuitive, Slim is the one man who comforts George at the end of the novella, tersely telling George,

'You hadda, George.  I swear you hadda.  Come on with me.'

Because Slim is reticent during the narrative, he may easily have held soliloquies in the privacy of moments.  Certainly, he could have gone over the final incident; yet, there are many other scenes from which his ponderings could produce a monologue in which he assesses before the men the significance of what has transpired in and out of the bunkhouse.

Perhaps, the scene could be the burial of Lennie, and Sim the single spokesperson as the man that all the others respect, and as the friend of George.  Slim can speak of the need for the men not to be so predatory with one another [like Curley and Carlson], to value friendship and not dismiss someone who has outlived his usefulness [like Carlson in his attitude about Candy's dog].

In order to make the monologue believable, it is important to stay within the character of Slim as created by Steinbeck.  So, review the narrative, looking for descriptions, actions, and words of Slim--those elements that create character development. Then, make what he "says" in "his" monologue consistent with the type of character that he is. (You can even repeat some of his words in the novella in the monologue that you write.)

Good luck!

 

coachingcorner's profile pic

coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Or... Lennie could be quite challenging too - he gets talked about a lot but we never really get inside his head except when George mentions what Lennie used to say, or what we can guess from the telling of the story.

It would be very interesting to know what he really thinks,whether he ever moved on from what George thinks he is about and how his feelings are doing. Maybe pick one passage about him, or something he feels strongly about, such as killing the things he pets by accident and do a monologue about how it made him feel. Sad? frustrated? Mad at himself? Wanting to do better next time? Angry that no-one understands... could be quite intriguing!

Use the links to help you build a sketch of his character as a reminder before you begin.

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