Who was the real Richard III? Was he innocent or guilty of the "murder" of the Princes in the Tower?

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Richard III was the last king of the House of York. He served as the king of England from 1483 until his death shortly after in 1485 when he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Richard's assent to the throne is a convoluted path. Richard's brother, Edward IV,...

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Richard III was the last king of the House of York. He served as the king of England from 1483 until his death shortly after in 1485 when he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Richard's assent to the throne is a convoluted path. Richard's brother, Edward IV, died in 1483, and Edward's son, Edward V, was going to be king. A problem was that Edward V was only 12 years old; therefore, Richard III was named Lord Protector to help the young Edward with ruling. Edward's coronation was planned for June 22, 1483, but before that ceremony occurred, Edward IV's marriage was declared invalid. Consequently, Edward V was prohibited from inheriting the throne. As a solution to the problem of who should be king, Richard III was declared the rightful king. Soon after Richard's crowning, Edward V and his brother, Richard, were placed into the Tower of London and never seen in public again.

At this point, the history gets rather murky. A common assumption is that Richard III had the two young princes murdered while they were in the Tower of London. The assumption is a result of believing that Richard would have the two boys killed to further secure his right to the throne. Richard III certainly isn't the only monarch in history accused of such things, but solid evidence that confirms this theory is lacking. We may never actually find out the truth about these two boys and Richard III.

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