Who was the last Tudor monarch of England?

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The Tudors were a dynasty of monarchs who ruled England circa 1485 (last period historically known as Medieval England), until 1603 which marks the death of Elizabeth I, daughter of Henry Tudor (Henry VIII) and Anne Boleyn. This period of time is the high Renaissance and, due to her Queendom, it is also known as "Elizabethan" England.

The Tudor monarchs were:

  • Henry VII (1485-1509)- brother of Henry VIII, died young and had married Catherine who later became the 1st wife of Henry VIII.
  • Henry VIII (1509-1547)- ascended after his brother's death, married the wife of his brother and later used that to justify a divorce to marry Anne Boleyn.
  • Edward VI (1547-1553)- the sickly, only male son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour.
  • Lady Jane Grey (1553) wife of John Dudley who was Chief Councilor of Edward VI.

She was queen for merely nine days, until the plot that raised her to the throne fell apart. She was reluctant to this plot. In fact, she was a victim of it, being quoted more than once as saying

But 'the Crown' has never been demanded... by me, or by anyone in my name.

In the end, she was beheaded.

  • Mary I, (the woman who inspired the "bloody Mary" epitaph) was the eldest (and now only) child of Henry VIII with Catherine of Aragon (his first wife) ruled from 1553-1558. The reason why she acquired the "bloody" epitaph is because she decided to restore Catholicism by, literally, burning protestants everywhere.
  • Elizabeth I was perhaps the strongest, most leveled monarch England ever had.

Her period of monarchy was dubbed "The Golden Age" and she far surpassed her father and her peers in terms of leadership, despite a crumbling personal life.

After Elizabeth I, since she had no heirs, it was her nephew James I, who took over. He was already a monarch in Scotland. He began the Stewart dynasty in England.

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