Who was to blame for the Cold War? Russia? America? Both?Could you please choose who you believe was to blame for the Cold War? There are many theories blaming the Cold War on the Russians, though...

Who was to blame for the Cold War? Russia? America? Both?

Could you please choose who you believe was to blame for the Cold War?

There are many theories blaming the Cold War on the Russians, though many of the theorists are from the West (so it maybe a biased opinion.)

I found several scholars claiming it was the Americans though the Soviets have not got much documentation to support some of their claims.

Thirdly, both maybe to blame, though I have only found a small handfull of academics who support this view.

So far, Russia is the one thats screaming out to me (due to the amount of scholars saying it is.) I just need an unbiased and educated opinion if possible. Can you pick which one you think is and why? Would appreciate it.

1* Russia?

2* America?

3* Both?

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larrygates's profile pic

larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

There was probably some degree of blame on both sides, although the bulk of the blame would necessarily fall on the Soviet Union.

The Soviets were uneasy and somewhat unwilling allies during World War II. Originally, Stalin had signed a non-aggression pact with Germany and the two had planned to divide Poland between them. Only after Hitler invaded the Soviet Union did that country ally with the United States.  It is generally considered to have been a mistake by President Roosevelt and General Eisenhower to allow the Soviets to take Berlin. The Soviets were intent on domination of all of Europe, and refused to withdraw troops from Germany at the war's end, and further attempted to starve out the city of West Berlin with the Berlin Blockade. They also set up puppet governments in Poland and other areas of Eastern Europe as part of their plan to dominate the continent. There continued aggression in these areas led to the U.S. policy of Containment, a vital element in the Cold War.

The U.S. must bear some blame for allowing this situation to develop. President Roosevelt, a thoroughly sick man, made concessions to Stalin at the Yalta conference which never should have been made in order to induce Stalin to enter the war against Japan. This ultimately proved unnecessary. Additionally, by it's use of the Atomic Bomb at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the U.S. (perhaps unwillingly) demonstrated to the Soviets that it possessed a weapon of unimaginable destruction which by its very nature put the latter in a position of perceived defensiveness. As with many situations in history, there is no clear right and wrong.  

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