Who is telling the story? Who is the speaker?

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Huxley uses an outside, effaced narrator. In other words, the narrator is not a character in the story, and has limited access to the consciousness of the characters . He rarely tells us what a character is thinking; instead he reveals character mostly through action and dialogue. He conveys little...

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Huxley uses an outside, effaced narrator. In other words, the narrator is not a character in the story, and has limited access to the consciousness of the characters. He rarely tells us what a character is thinking; instead he reveals character mostly through action and dialogue. He conveys little sense of his own presence. This allows the author to take an ironic, even cynical tone - relying on implied sarcasm rather than preaching to the reader what precicely he believes.

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