Who is telling the story in "The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky"?  

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The narrator in "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" is omniscient third-person. They have insight into the emotions and thoughts of every character in the story rather than being limited to only one (as in the Harry Potter series where we only get insight into the psychological state...

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The narrator in "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" is omniscient third-person. They have insight into the emotions and thoughts of every character in the story rather than being limited to only one (as in the Harry Potter series where we only get insight into the psychological state of one character at a time).

While we get insight into all the characters, the narrator still keeps an emotional distance from them, never judging anyone or telling the readers how they should feel about them. All the characters are rendered sympathetic in some way, even Scratchy Wilson.

Had the story been told in first-person from, say, the bride's point of view, we would have a more limited perspective of events. We wouldn't get Scratchy's connection with Jack, for instance.

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Stephen Crane’s short story "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" is told from the point of view of a third person omniscient narrator.

The narrator is not a character in the story, but has the ability to discuss the emotions and thoughts of the main characters in the story. The narrator sets the stage for the story, but also provides insight into the welfare of the people the reader encounters.

After describing how the town marshal, Jack Potter, and his new bride appeared as they rode the train from their wedding in San Antonio to the west Texas town of Yellow Sky, the narrator tells the reader, “They were evidently very happy.” This gives the reader an image of the characters and an indication of their feelings. Throughout the story, the narrator delves into the characters in this way by describing their thoughts and actions. The omniscient narrator brings all of the characters to life instead of focusing on one.

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