Who is the speaker in "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night?  

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The speaker in Dylan Thomas 's famous poem reveals very little about him or herself. Throughout the poem, the speaker is exhorting those in "old age" to "rage" against the inevitability of death. While the speaker accepts that it is dignified to know when death is the only unavoidable truth,...

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The speaker in Dylan Thomas's famous poem reveals very little about him or herself. Throughout the poem, the speaker is exhorting those in "old age" to "rage" against the inevitability of death. While the speaker accepts that it is dignified to know when death is the only unavoidable truth, he or she does not want the old to simply go "gentle" into it, without fighting.

In the final stanzas of the poem, it is explained to an extent why the speaker feels this way. As it transpires, the speaker is addressing the poem to his own father. As such, it becomes clearer to us why he is so concerned with those about to die and why he holds the belief that they should "rage" against the impending darkness. The speaker does not want his father to slip away quietly; he wants evidence to be shown that his father is fighting his impending death, and begs him to "bless" those he leaves behind.

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The narrator of "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" is a son or daughter speaking to their father.  The last stanza of the poem specifically addresses the speaker's "father," when the speaker asks him to "Curse, bless" them with his "fierce tears."  The entire poem is all about various kinds of people -- wise, good, wild, and grave or serious -- and the fact they these individuals refuse to die quietly; instead, they fight against death and try to live as long as possible.  In the final stanza, however, because the speaker is addressing his or her father, these descriptive lines actually become prescriptive: they become instructions.  The speaker now tells their father to resist death and refuse to go quietly.  The speaker wants their father to cry "fierce tears" because such tears would prove that the father is really fighting.

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