Who sent Miss Strangeworth the green letter?

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When Miss Strangeworth is writing her anonymous letters she prepares three of them on different-colored sheets of paper and in matching envelopes. 

She addressed an envelope to Don Crane using a pink envelope to match the pink paper. The pink color seems appropriate to her because the letter is about...

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When Miss Strangeworth is writing her anonymous letters she prepares three of them on different-colored sheets of paper and in matching envelopes. 

She addressed an envelope to Don Crane using a pink envelope to match the pink paper. The pink color seems appropriate to her because the letter is about a baby girl. The message reads: 

Didn’t you ever see an idiot child before? Some people just shouldn’t have children, should they?

On a green sheet addressed to Mrs. Harper in a matching green envelope, she writes:

Have you found out yet what they were all laughing about after you left the bridge club on Thursday? Or is the wife really the last one to know?

And on a blue sheet addressed to old Mrs. Foster in a matching blue envelope, she writes:

You never know about doctors. Remember they’re only human and need money like the rest of us. Suppose the knife slipped accidentally. Would Doctor Burns get his fee and a little extra from that nephew of yours?

Later she goes for her evening walk and stops by the post office where she always mails her poison-pen letters. She does not notice that one of her three letters does not go into the mail slot, but falls on the floor. The teenaged boy named Dave Harris, for whom she has caused so much trouble with a letter to his girlfriend Linda Stewart's parents, picks up the letter. He tells Linda:

“It’s for Don Crane,… this letter…. Might as well take it on over.”

The author does not include a scene in which Dave hand-delivers the letter in the pink envelope to the addressee Don Crane, but the reader can imagine that Dave said something like this: "Miss Strangeworth dropped this on the floor at the post office by accident. It's for you, Don." So for the first time Miss Strangeworth is tied to one of her anonymous letters.

The reader has not been introduced to Don Crane but has seen Miss Strangeworth talking to Don's wife Helen and has overheard part of their conversation about the Crane's six-month-old baby girl. The most important part of that conversation went like this:

“I suppose you’ve got young Don all upset about the fact that his daughter is already six months old and hasn’t yet begun to learn to dance?”

“I haven’t mentioned it to him. I suppose she’s just so precious that I worry about her all the time.”

So Don Crane understands that Miss Strangeworth wants both him and Helen to be worried about their precious little daughter and is probably trying to interfere with their love-making by warning him that he might have fathered an idiot child and could be in danger of doing the same thing again. Don Crane realizes what a fiend this dear, sweet old lady really is. He gets back at her by ruining all her rose bushes during the night and sending her an anonymous letter on green paper in a matching envelope reading:

Look out at what used to be your roses.

There seems to be a method in Miss Strangeworth's apparent madness. In three cases she writes letters intended to create trouble between couples. They are the youngsters, Linda Stewart and Dave Harris; the new parents, Don and Helen Crane; and the middle-aged couple, Mr. and Mrs. Harper. Miss Strangeworth is posing as a sweet, little old lady, but she is a lonely, pathetic old maid who is full of envy and jealousy and bitterness. She does not understand her own motives for writing her poison-pen letters. She tells herself she is a guardian of the town's morality, but she really wants other people to share in her unhappiness. She gets just what she deserves when Don Crane destroys all her previous rose bushes, but we cannot help feeling a little sorry for her when she reads Don's anonymous letter and begins to "cry silently for the wickedness of the world." 

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