Who says this in The Outsiders? "Sixteen years on the streets and you can learn a lot. But all the wrong things, not the things you want to learn. Sixteen years on the streets and you see a lot. But all the wrong sights, not the things you want to see." On what page is it?

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In Chapter 8, Two-Bit and Ponyboy visit Johnny in the hospital. When Pony and Two-Bit initially see Johnny, he tells them that he is scared to die and laments about his unfortunate situation. On page 122 of the Speak edition of S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders, Pony says to himself,

Sixteen years on the street and you can learn alot. But all the wrongs things, not the things you want to learn. Sixteen years on the street and you see alot. But all the wrong sights, not the sights you want to see (Hinton, 122).

Ponyboy sympathizes with Johnny's difficult situation and realizes the extent of his tragedy. Pony understands Johnny's angst and knows that he has not had a chance to see the world. In Johnny's short life, he has only experienced the difficult nature of their rough city and has suffered more than he has enjoyed life. Johnny fears dying without having a chance to fully experience the world and thrive outside of the city, which is what makes his death particularly tragic. Shortly after Johnny admits to Pony that he is scared to die, his mother attempts to visit him. Johnny denies his mother's request to see him and Pony and Two-Bit end up going to see Dally. Following the rumble, Johnny dies and Dally ends up losing his mind.

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Although no one says these lines out loud, Ponyboy says them to himself, in his mind. It's something he's thinking while talking with Johnny, right after Johnny had said that sixteen years isn't long enough to live, and that Johnny wishes he could see and do more things, especially travel beyond their neighborhood more, before dying. Ponyboy silently agrees, and even though he's also thinking that sixteen years as a gang member means that you see things you shouldn't see, he doesn't voice these thoughts out loud: he doesn't share them with Johnny. It's important for Ponyboy not to upset Johnny, and not to get too emotional. 

You can find this discussion a little less than halfway through Chapter 8, as Johnny is lying in critical condition in the hospital after saving the kids from the fire. The exact page number will be different depending on which version of the text you have, but if you open to Chapter 8 and scoot past the conversation that includes Two-Bit, then you've found the conversation that Johnny and Ponyboy have alone. And if you scan for the beginning of a paragraph that starts with the words "Sixteen years," then you've found it. If you've reached some longer paragraphs that mention Two-Bit again, plus Johnny's mother, then you've gone too far--scoot back to where the paragraphs are short and contain a lot of quotation marks to indicate the conversation.

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