Who saved the boys in Lord of the Flies?

In Lord of the Flies, the boys are saved by members of the British Navy after a cruiser spots the massive brush fire on the island. When the boys chase Ralph onto the beach, they are surprised to find a British naval officer standing in the sand with his boat and crew behind him. Jack and his hunters refrain from harming Ralph in front of the officer, and the boys are rescued.

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In chapter 12, Jack and his band of hunters chase Ralph through the forest with plans of decapitating him. After forming a cordon, Jack orders his hunters to set fire to the forest in an attempt to smoke Ralph out of his hiding spot. Jack's strategy works, and Ralph is...

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In chapter 12, Jack and his band of hunters chase Ralph through the forest with plans of decapitating him. After forming a cordon, Jack orders his hunters to set fire to the forest in an attempt to smoke Ralph out of his hiding spot. Jack's strategy works, and Ralph is forced to flee from the underbrush, racing through the forest as trees explode into flames. Jack and his hunters spot Ralph and are close to catching him when Ralph stumbles onto the beach and collapses. When Ralph stands up, he is surprised to see a British naval officer dressed in an immaculate white uniform with a cruiser stationed behind him.

Jack and his hunters follow Ralph onto the beach and immediately stop chasing him when they see the British officer. The officer proceeds to ask Ralph if there are any grown-ups on the island and assumes that the boys are playing a friendly game of war. The officer is astonished to learn that two boys were killed and informs Ralph that they saw the smoke coming from the island. The officer then examines the boys' appearance and says,

I should have thought that a pack of British boys—you’re all British, aren’t you?—would have been able to put up a better show than that—I mean—.

Although the officer is disappointed by the boys' appearance and conduct, he cannot begin to grasp the tragedies they have experienced. Ralph then thinks about Piggy's death and is overcome with emotion. He recognizes his and the others' loss of innocence and begin to weep in front of the British officer before they all sail away from the island.

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