Who said the following quote in Julius Caesar and to whom?  What does it mean?: "Set honor in one eye and death i'th' other, and I will look on both indifferently."

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The context of the quote is as follows: Cassius and Brutus are together on a street in Rome. They hear shouts and wonder what that is about. Brutus says he "fear[s]" it means the people have made Caesar king. Cassius jumps quickly on the word "fear" and says, so you don't want that to happen? Brutus responds as follows:

I would not, Cassius. Yet I love him well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honor in one eye and death i' th' other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honor more than I fear death.
Brutus is saying that he wouldn't like Caesar to become king, even though he loves him very much. Then he asks, somewhat impatiently: why are you keeping me here? What do you want? Following that come the lines in question:
Set honor in one eye and death i' th' other,
And I will look on both indifferently
What Brutus means is that, as he says in the line right before these two, if it is for the general good—i.e., the good of Rome—he can look at both honor and death objectively ["indifferently"]. In other words, he is willing to sacrifice both his honor and/or his life if this, objectively speaking, will help Rome. He also notes, however, that he loves his honor more than he fears his death. (From the start, Brutus's thinking is a little murky, a problem that will plague him throughout the play.)
Brutus senses that Cassius has an agenda and seems to intuit he will propose something risky. Cassius does have an agenda: he burns with personal resentment that Julius Caesar, once his equal, has now risen high. It makes him furious to think he might have to bow down to this man, who he thinks is no better than he is. Therefore, he wants to assassinate Caesar, and he knows if he can get someone as honorable and reputable as Brutus to join the plot, it will add legitimacy to the murder.
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This quote is from Act I, scene 2 of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

Brutus says this in conversation with Cassius.  They are agreeing that it is wrong for one man ~ Caesar ~ to have so much power over everyone else.  Bear in mind that for almost 500 years, Rome had been a republic, with power divided according to a constitution.  The rise of Caesar is considered by many historians to have been the turning point from republic to empire, with one all-powerful ruler.

In Shakespeare's play, the larger quote is:

If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honour in one eye and death i' the other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honour more than I fear death.

Brutus is asking Cassius what he wants of him.  The meaning of his words are that if it is for the good of Rome, he will do what honor requires even if it means death.  He should enjoy good luck from the gods only as long as he loves honor more than he fears death.

I will leave it to you to figure out what Cassius wants Brutus to do.

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