Who is the protagonist in Ray Bradbury's "The Veldt"?

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The famous science fiction short story "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury tells of a family living in a futuristic home with a high-tech nursery that can create realistic virtual worlds. Concerned that the children are becoming too absorbed in the fantasies created by the nursery, the parents call...

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The famous science fiction short story "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury tells of a family living in a futuristic home with a high-tech nursery that can create realistic virtual worlds. Concerned that the children are becoming too absorbed in the fantasies created by the nursery, the parents call a psychiatrist. He urges them to turn off the house to help the children get readjusted to reality. When the children realize that their parents are going to deprive them of the wonders of the nursery, they trap their parents on the veldt with man-eating lions.

The protagonist is the main character of the story who makes the most important decisions and has to deal with the consequences. Using this definition, we would have to say that George Hadley, the husband of Lydia and the father of the two children, is the protagonist. Until the final few paragraphs, the entire story is told from his viewpoint. He is the only character whose thoughts Bradbury reveals. He makes the key decisions upon which the plot turns, such as calling the psychiatrist and turning off the automated features of the house. He is also the person who relents at the end, reopens the nursery one last time, and suffers the consequences of his actions as he is trapped on the veldt with his wife.

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In "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury, the children's father, George Hadley, is the protagonist. He is the one who makes the life changing (ending) decision about the nursery. This allows the children to "play" in the veldt one more time. At first George stands firm despite the children's crying, but Lydia cannot stand it, so he allows the children one more minute in their African veldt. Then he plans   to turn off the entire house and take the family on vacation. Sadly for George and Lydia, another minute is all that is necessary for the children to set their plan into action. The nursery is all they need because it has become better than a parent and twice as good as two parents. George Hadley unknowingly brings about his own demise as well as that of his wife.

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