Who owns responsibility for insuring literacy in children?I'm doing a dissertation....Michael Rosen asks "who owns literacy" What has the government done to literacy in schools? "children to take...

Who owns responsibility for insuring literacy in children?

I'm doing a dissertation....Michael Rosen asks "who owns literacy"

What has the government done to literacy in schools?

"children to take control over literacy"?

Who else speaks of this?

Asked on by tarsh

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wordprof | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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This area of inquiry into literacy in children (important politically because many advocates for government spending on early childhood--this is primarily a British debate--feel there is not enough attention paid to phonics in early education) is centered on Michael Rosen’s and Jim Rose’s emphasis on the importance of phonics in early literacy training. (Older schools of thought emphasized writing and reading and the forming of letters; these new educational theorists feel that verbal language—speaking and listening and teaching the phonic sounds of letters and syllables—is the best beginning for literacy.) Before government-sponsored early education program, the parents were presumably responsible for encouraging speaking and listening at home—bedtime stories, nursery rhymes, word games, and the like—and school was responsible for reading and writing. An early pioneer of phonics in reading was Maria Montessori, the Italian teacher of poor children, whose methods have been transformed into an alternate school system, for grades up to eighth, but primarily effective for “pre-school” ages. In her series of phonetically-motivated books (“Gus has Fuzz”), she gives ages 3-5 opportunities to learn reading by associating the sounds of letters with the sandpaper shape of the letters. While government hegemonies are not convinced that this method should apply to all education, they have seen value in the phonic method for children who are struggling with traditional methods.

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