Who is the narrator of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?

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Huckleberry Finn, also referred to as Huck Finn, is the narrator of the novel. This means that the story is narrated in first person, where we as readers are aware of everything that happens in the story through his perspective. Huck Finn is thirteen years old and the son of...

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Huckleberry Finn, also referred to as Huck Finn, is the narrator of the novel. This means that the story is narrated in first person, where we as readers are aware of everything that happens in the story through his perspective. Huck Finn is thirteen years old and the son of the town drunkard who for the most part, is absent from Huck's life. He is adopted by Widow Douglass and her sister Miss Watson, who attempt to shape him based on societal norms. Regardless of him being on the lower end of the social ladder, he is an intelligent boy who is full of wit and able to think for himself. How a thirteen year old deals with relatively heavy issues relating to social status, racism, and slavery form an important part of the novel.

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Twain employs the frame tale technique to begin the novel; Huckleberry Finn informs readers that the writer is Mark Twain, but the story is Huck's own, as he uses the first-person pronoun to relate the events of his adventures.

Huckleberry Finn is thought to be approximately thirteen years old. He has no mother, and his father, Pap Finn, is in and out of his life, and never in a positive or nurturing way. In fact, Pap is a drunk whose ambition is to get his hands on the money that Judge Thatcher is keeping safe for Huck. Huck is being looked after by the well-intentioned Widow Douglas before he runs away.

As Huck narrates the many episodes that comprise the novel, his perspective shows that despite growing up in a racist society, his essential humanity is intact. The farther from society's influence he gets, the more his own sense of right and wrong emerges.

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The narrator in the novel is Huck Finn himself. He tells the story from his point of view as a young man and in his own dialect and language. The eNotes study guide tells us that this novel is "one of the first in America to employ the child's perspective and employ the vernacular—a language specific to a region or group of people—throughout the book."

Not only do we hear Huck's own voice in the novel, but through his relating of his adventures, we hear other southern dialects, such as that of former slaves. All of this comes from the perspective of a child in the post-Civil War era.

 

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The narrator of this novel is Huck Finn himself.  He is a young boy without a mother and whose father is considered the town drunk (when he's around at all).  We learn a lot about Huck Finn in just the first few paragraphs of the novel.  He tells us who he is, but also mentions the book is being written by Mr. Mark Twain, who also wrote Tom Sawyer - so, from the beginning, we are directly told that the events will come from the pen of Twain through the mouth of Huck Finn.  Being twice removed from the story gives it a hint of question-ability which is increased when Huck confesses that Twain did tell some 'stretchers' in the first book - leading us to believe he could tell some 'stretchers' in this one as well.  Huck goes on to give us other info, such as his negative views of religion, civilization, and eventually slavery.  Because the novel comes from supposedly such a young perspective, the reader easily accepts Huck as innocent and honest making easier for Twain to express his message through his narrator.

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