Who is the main character of the play Justice?

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William Falder is the main character in the play Justice by John Galsworthy. The plot of the play follows Falder's tribulations as he falls into the unsympathetic and unceasing wheels of the justice system.

Even though it is clear that Falder has committed a crime by falsifying a check, betraying the trust of his employer, he is immediately painted as a sympathetic character. The audience is made to feel for William Falder and his plight. Even though he has committed a crime, his intentions are noble as he hoped to use the money to rescue the love of his life, Ruth Honeywill, from her abusive husband.

The play follows Falder's plight through the courtroom and prison. Galsworthy uses these scenes of the execution of justice to point out the injustices inherent in that very system. Falder suffers greatly in prison. Galsworthy seems to suggest that the degree of Falder's suffering is far out of proportion to the crime he committed. He also uses this as an opportunity to point out the horrid and inhumane conditions of prisons.

Once released, his plight has hardly improved as he has lost Ruth forever and is arrested for failing to report for parole. If Falder is the protagonist of this story, then it is the system of justice itself that serves as the antagonist. This is made all the more poignant when Falder, destroyed by the system, takes his own life.

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In Justice, a play written by the English playwright John Galsworthy, the plot follows a young clerk named William Falder who forges a nine-pound bank note to become worth ninety pounds.

Since Falder is the character whom the plot most closely follows, and with whom the play most frequently sympathizes with, he is certainly the main character of the play. His motives are generally pure: he hopes to help a woman with whom he is in love, the wife of an abusive alcoholic. Once questioned about the forgery, Falder quickly admits to the crime. When he is released, he vows to keep his love in his life: "I couldn't give her up. I couldn't! Oh, sir! I'm all she's got to look to. And I'm sure she's all I've got!"

Eventually, Falder is arrested again for failing to report to his parole officer, and he throws himself down the stairs, breaking his own neck in a brutal act of suicide. The play thus follows the entire fall of Falder, and while the play remains sympathetic with him, he is ultimately killed anyways.

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