Who does Laertes initially blame for the death of his father in act 4, scene 5?

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Laertes has been away at school, apparently oblivious to all the intrigue at home until his father dies. When he returns to Denmark, a faction of the people take his side against Claudius , calling for him to be king. They even accompany him into the castle when he goes...

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Laertes has been away at school, apparently oblivious to all the intrigue at home until his father dies. When he returns to Denmark, a faction of the people take his side against Claudius, calling for him to be king. They even accompany him into the castle when he goes to confront Claudius and demand his father's body.

Apparently, Laertes heard conflicting reports because his first question is, "How came he dead?" Although his lines do not explicitly accuse Claudius and Gertrude, it is implied by his fury and his bold actions that, to some extent, he holds them responsible. The killing did occur in their castle.

He then tells the king and queen that he wants the truth and owes them no loyalty: "To hell, allegiance! Vows, to the blackest devil!" He does not care what it costs, even damnation into the "profoundest pit" of hell; he wants the truth and vengeance.

Claudius manages to calm him down while steering him toward taking revenge on the actual killer, not himself, but stops short of naming Hamlet. Things get worse when Ophelia enters, seeming insane.

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Laertes initially suspects that the King has some involvement in his father's death. He bursts into the King's chambers to demand information about his father's death.

Claudius knows there is talk that Laertes might be King and Claudius does not want Laertes to have reason to hate him. The King easily manipulates Laertes into doubting his suspicions by vowing to give up everything he has-even his life-if he in any way had anything to do with Polonius' death.

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