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Historically Julius Caesar rose to power in Rome and eventually declared himself dictator of Rome for life.  He was a great military leader.  His conquests even reached as far as what is now England, when he conquered the Britons in 55 BC.  However, declaring himself dictator of Rome didn't sit well with...

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Historically Julius Caesar rose to power in Rome and eventually declared himself dictator of Rome for life.  He was a great military leader.  His conquests even reached as far as what is now England, when he conquered the Britons in 55 BC.  However, declaring himself dictator of Rome didn't sit well with others and he was assassinated on March 15 44 BC.

His assassination is the basis for Shakespeare's historical tragedy, "Julius Caesar."  Here Brutus, Caesar's trusted friend, and a conspirator, Cassius, conspire to murder Caesar for the good of Rome.  The only problem is that Caesar hasn't really done anything worthy of being assassinated for.  Brutus only contends that they should kill him before he becomes corrupted by the absolute power he will lead as dictator of Rome. 

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Julius Caesar descended from Roman nobility, but he also claimed that he was a descendant of Aeneas, an ancient king and founder of Rome.  He favored the causes of  the common people more than aristocrats, in fact, Caesar’s life and career was shaped by the pressures of finance and  politics.  More in depth information may be found at the link below.

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Julius Caesar is a Roman statesman and General, he was the leader who was assasinated. Some argue that he is arrogant, and there is a big qustion throughout the play if he is a good or poor leader.

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