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I felt a Funeral, in my Brain

by Emily Dickinson
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Who is the speaker addressing in "I felt a Funeral, in my Brain"?

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In "I felt a Funeral, in my Brain," the speaker is addressing herself, isolated as she is from the world around her.

This isolation, this profound sense of being cut off from the rest of humanity, is illustrated in the last lines from the fourth stanza:

And I,...

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In "I felt a Funeral, in my Brain," the speaker is addressing herself, isolated as she is from the world around her.

This isolation, this profound sense of being cut off from the rest of humanity, is illustrated in the last lines from the fourth stanza:

And I, and Silence, some strange Race

Wrecked, solitary, here -

In other words, the speaker is all alone in the world, in body and mind, shipwrecked on life's shore.

Unable to comprehend what's happening in her mind, the funeral in her brain, the speaker cannot express what this all means, which means that it would be impossible for her to relate her strange visions to other people.

The possibility of communicating what's going on in the speaker's mind is further complicated by the fact that she no longer feels fully human. This is what she means when she refers to a “strange Race.”

Lacking a sense of what it means to be human, she cannot reach out and share her thoughts with other humans. Instead, she can only remain trapped in her own mind, talking to and with herself.

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