Who is the poet thanking in the poem "To a Butterfly"?

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The speaker in Wordsworth's "To a Butterfly" is not explicitly thanking anything or anyone, but he is addressing the butterfly with much urgency and joy, asking him to stay nearby a little longer:

Float near me; do not yet depart!Dead times revive in thee...

The speaker is...

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The speaker in Wordsworth's "To a Butterfly" is not explicitly thanking anything or anyone, but he is addressing the butterfly with much urgency and joy, asking him to stay nearby a little longer:

Float near me; do not yet depart!
Dead times revive in thee...

The speaker is implicitly thanking the butterfly for triggering memories of his family and times past, saying that "dead" times "revive" in the butterfly. He remembers, in particular, chasing butterflies with his sister, a person he calls Emmeline in the poem. These were, he says, "pleasant, pleasant" days.

The deep, heartfelt emotion the speaker is experiencing, as well as his desire for the butterfly to remains close, are highlighted by Wordsworth's use of exclamation points: five in the first stanza and one in the second stanza. He may not say directly to the butterfly that he is thankful for his presence, but it is nevertheless clear that he is grateful to the creature for bringing back bright moments from the past.

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