Who is most to blame for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet?

Readers might consider the character of Friar Laurence to be deserving of the most blame for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet, because he encouraged and enabled their secret relationship and orchestrated the plan that led to their demise. Other characters deserving of blame include the Capulets and the Montagues, who continued a violent and pointless feud, as well as Romeo and Juliet themselves, whose impulsive impulsive actions and unwise choices led to their unnecessary deaths.

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In the prologue, Shakespeare identifies fate as the culprit responsible for Romeo and Juliet 's death, calling them "star-crossed lovers." The feud between their families is also largely responsible for their deaths. As they both recognize during the balcony scene, the family feud makes it impossible to openly declare...

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In the prologue, Shakespeare identifies fate as the culprit responsible for Romeo and Juliet's death, calling them "star-crossed lovers." The feud between their families is also largely responsible for their deaths. As they both recognize during the balcony scene, the family feud makes it impossible to openly declare their love. As Juliet declares, "Wherefore are thou Romeo," meaning why are you a Montague, a forbidden love?

However, if we must assign individual blame, it can be shared between the friar and Romeo. The friar did not have to secretly marry the two young people. In fact, some critics have noted the symbolism of Romeo meeting him in a herb garden amid both poisons and potions: the friar can be seen as the serpent in the garden, leading the young couple astray. Especially at the end, with his scheme of having Juliet drink a potion that feigns death, the friar, to save himself from exposure, risks Juliet: the honest path would have been to confess to Lord Capulet that he had married her to Romeo.

Romeo is also to blame. He is younger, so the friar arguably should have behaved more as the adult in the room, but Romeo's impetuous impulsivity and entitled desire to always immediately have what he wants paves the way for disaster. Coercing a starving apothecary into illegally selling him poison and then dramatically taking it as soon as he sees the seemingly dead Juliet are both the acts of a typical adolescent, but these acts are disastrous.

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There are several characters who could be considered most to blame for the tragic deaths of Romeo and Juliet, beginning with the Capulets and Montagues. It is their longstanding family feud that prevents Romeo and Juliet from publicly expressing their love. The bitter family feud forces Romeo and Juliet to conceal their love and marry in private at Friar Laurence's cell. If their families were on good terms, Romeo would have been officially invited to the Capulet ball and Tybalt would not have been offended by his presence. Romeo could have simply approached Juliet, and the two lovers would have been more than happy to publicly reveal their strong feelings for each other.

Tybalt can also be blamed for Romeo and Juliet's tragic deaths. Tybalt's aggression influences Romeo to intervene in his fight with Mercutio, leading to the death of Romeo's close friend and his eventual exile. If Tybalt were not such a hothead, Mercutio would still be alive and Romeo would have never been banished. It is Romeo's banishment and Paris's sudden marriage proposal that influence Friar Laurence to devise a faulty plan in hopes of reuniting the lovers.

One can also place the blame on Romeo for his and Juliet's tragic deaths. Romeo's impulsive, rash actions influence him to marry Juliet in secret. Rather than taking things slow with Juliet and considering their family feud, Romeo insists on marrying her. His impetuous personality also influences him to react out of passion and kill Tybalt. It is Romeo's rash behavior that also causes him to commit suicide at the end of the play.

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In Act V, Scene 3, Friar Laurence's fear of the guards finding him in the tomb directly leads to the death of Juliet; for, had he remained with Juliet, she would not have been able to kill herself.

Friar Laurence. ....For the watch is coming. / Come, go, good Juliet, I dare no longer stay.

Juliet. Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.

[Exit Friar Laurence]

If, then, there is but one culprit who must be chosen, Friar Laurence is the most culpable as he secretly marries the lovers, he hides Romeo, and he provides Juliet with the sleeping potion; moreover, he leaves the emotionally vulnerable Juliet when he could have forced her out of the tomb with him.

His failure to speak with the parents and seek to ameliorate their hatred and his other actions go completely against his religious vows as well as being unconscionable.

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There are several people that could be blamed for the deaths of these two young people, including their parents, by keeping the feud between the two families going. Mercutio can be blamed, to some degree. He was the one who got Romeo to go to the ball. When Mercutio was killed, Romeo avenged his death, and ended up having to leave Verona instead of staying with Juliet.

However, one of the characters who is most to blame could be Friar Laurence. Friar Laurence was the wise adviser to Romeo and Juliet. He kept their secret and helped them be together. He was the one who married the two, hoping that the marriage would cause an end to the feuding. He was the one who came up with the idea of giving Juliet the potion to put her in a coma-like state for 42 hours. He wrote a letter to Romeo, explaining the plan, but the letter never reached Romeo. After the two of them died, the Friar left, so his plan was never found out. Friar Laurence, being a man of God, could have gone to the families and told them that the feuding had to end. They may have listened to him. They trusted him. The nurse is another one who can be blamed, as well. She was Juliet's trusted friend. She sent letters to Romeo for Juliet. She helped Juliet when she was going to marry Romeo. When it was told that Romeo was gone, the nurse agreed that Juliet should marry Paris. She didn't stand up for Juliet's love for Romeo.

Some of the blame also has to be placed on the shoulders of Romeo and Juliet. They were young and reckless. Instead of trying to figure out a way to make their relationship work, they both killed themselves. They have to be held responsible to some extent. This beautiful tragedy has many people that can be blamed. Two young people, who truly loved each other, felt that they had no other choice than to do what they did. The people in their lives could have prevented all of this. That is the true tragedy.

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