Who had the right to vote in the British colonies?

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Voting rights were limited in the thirteen British colonies. The colonists did have the opportunity to vote for some of their political leaders, especially the members of the lower house of the assemblies. In a few colonies, the colonists could vote for the governor. This right existed only in the...

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Voting rights were limited in the thirteen British colonies. The colonists did have the opportunity to vote for some of their political leaders, especially the members of the lower house of the assemblies. In a few colonies, the colonists could vote for the governor. This right existed only in the colonies of Connecticut and Rhode Island. More often than not, the King of England chose the governor for each colony.

Generally, in order to vote, a person had to meet certain qualifications. Only white males were allowed to vote. These white males had to be at least twenty-one years old, and they had to own property. The practice of limiting voting rights continued for many years after the colonists in the thirteen British colonies declared their independence from Great Britain and created the United States of America.

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