Who does Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, blame for slavery?

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The novel puts the blame squarely on the slave-owners themselves, but the root cause of slavery, to the Christian Stowe's mind, seems to be a lack of Christian love in the hearts of the slave-owners. This is the very thing which makes them blind to the immorality of their actions....

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The novel puts the blame squarely on the slave-owners themselves, but the root cause of slavery, to the Christian Stowe's mind, seems to be a lack of Christian love in the hearts of the slave-owners. This is the very thing which makes them blind to the immorality of their actions. They use their slaves like objects and profit from their degradation. While some slave-owners are kinder than others, as in they do not beat or rape their slaves, Stowe is firm that slavery is wrong, no matter how "nicely" one treats a slave, because at its heart, slavery is about turning a person created in the divine image of God into nothing more than a glorified object to be used without their consent.

They do not see the slaves as fellow human beings, and therefore feel nothing about treating them as breathing property. The characters who best embody the Gospel's notions of love, such as Little Eva and the Quakers, reject slavery as an institution.

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Stowe blames slavery on the owners who profiteered on human misery.  In my mind, she is quite direct about this.  One of the reasons why Stowe's work was so pivotal in American History was because of its direct and simple nature.  In Stowe's mind, the reason for slavery resided squarely on the shoulders of those individuals who profited from it and defended it. She is quite direct about this and this is the reason why the book was so controversial at the time.  She doesn't mince words on it nor does she explore the complex politicizing of the issue at the time.  In her mind, slavery was immoral in its treatment of other human beings and those who engaged in it and defended it were immoral and to blame for the the condition of servitude in America of the time.

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This is open to debate, as you're talking about the background motivations of an author in the 1850s.  The novel itself was written in response to the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act, requiring Northerners to aid the recapture of runaway slaves.  In this sense, she blames lawmakers. 

On another level, Stowe blames slaveowners, some of whom are portrayed as kind and paternalistic in the novel.  To her, slaveowning is an absolute moral wrong, regardless of how kind or cruel an owner is.

Lastly, I think she places blame on those in the North who tolerate slavery, or refuse to take up the abolitionist cause.  I think she is most angry with this crowd, particularly northern Chrisitians.

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