Who would make a better leader of Animal Farm in Animal Farm, Snowball or Napoleon?

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Snowball would make a better leader than Napoleon. His capacity is demonstrated before Napoleon uses the dogs to run him off Animal Farm.

Snowball is hardworking and a planner, and he thinks ahead. For example, he is intelligent enough to know that Farmer Jones will mount an attack...

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Snowball would make a better leader than Napoleon. His capacity is demonstrated before Napoleon uses the dogs to run him off Animal Farm.

Snowball is hardworking and a planner, and he thinks ahead. For example, he is intelligent enough to know that Farmer Jones will mount an attack to retake Animal Farm, and he prepares for that by studying the military campaigns of Julius Caesar. He also anticipates what the animals' needs will be and so can formulate good ideas, such as building the windmill.

While Snowball favors some privileges for the pigs, he also has the welfare of all the animals at heart. He rules through rationalism, courage, and persuasion.

Napoleon, however, rules entirely through force and fear. He uses the violence of the dogs, who act as his private police force, to impose his will on the farm. He is lazy, unintelligent, cowardly, and self-aggrandizing. He cares nothing for the needs and feelings of the other animals: for example, he is willing to have animals who oppose him executed, and he shows no sympathy to the hens' desire to keep their eggs. He also sells the hardworking and loyal Boxer to the glue factory at the end of his life, depriving this exemplary animal of his promised retirement and showing utter heartlessness. He will tell any lie to maintain his power, using the cleverer Squealer as his propagandist, and he believes in no value higher than his own comfort.

Snowball is a portrait of an individual who rules through reason, intelligence, and hard work, while Napoleon is the classic narcissistic dictator, ruling through fear, violence, lies, and manipulation.

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On the whole, you'd have to say that Snowball would be a better leader than Napoleon. (Though admittedly, that's not saying much). Yes, Snowball is a fanatical believer in the Animalist revolution, which probably would've led to disaster no matter who was in charge, but at least no one could have doubted his sincerity.

Napoleon, on the other hand, is a total hypocrite and opportunist who cynically uses—or rather, abuses—Animalism for his own personal gain. What's more, he's a complete coward, something else that sets him apart from Snowball. During the epic Battle of the Cowshed, Snowball bravely leads the other animals against the hated human oppressor, whereas Napoleon is missing in action. At the very least, a good leader must be brave and be someone who can inspire and set a good example. In this regard, as in so much else, Snowball is streets ahead of Napoleon.

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Considering the fact that Napoleon usurps power and rules the farm as a ruthless tyrant, one could easily argue that Snowball would be a much better leader. Unlike Napoleon, who is inherently selfish, violent, and authoritative, Snowball champions equality among all animals and develops committees to give each animal a say in the government's policies. Snowball also values education and spends a considerable amount of time attempting to teach the other animals how to read and write. In addition to championing equality and education, Snowball is an intelligent pig who develops elaborate plans to construct a windmill, which will modernize the farm and contribute to improving the standard of living.

Unlike Napoleon, who is selfishly concerned about elevating his position of authority and feeding his own ego, Snowball is genuinely motivated to improve life on the farm and make old Major's vision come true. Snowball is also a courageous, capable leader who develops a successful military strategy to defeat the humans. He also demonstrates his bravery and commitment to Animal Farm when he is wounded during the Battle of the Cowshed. Despite the fact that Snowball is not a shrewd, ruthless politician like Napoleon, he has admirable goals and possesses important leadership qualities. Tragically, he is driven from the farm after Napoleon usurps power and proceeds to rule as a ruthless tyrant.

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Napoleon and Snowball do not make effective co-leaders.  Snowball has greater leadership skills, but Napoleon is more ruthless.

As co-leaders, Snowball and Napoleon are at a stalemate.  They do not get along, and when each contradicts the other it is hard to get things done.  This results in division of the farm into factions, which is not healthy.

The animals formed themselves into two factions under the slogan, `Vote for Snowball and the three-day week' and `Vote for Napoleon and the full manger.' (ch 5)

As a leader, Snowball has good ideas and seems to really care about being democratic.  He wants the animals to self-govern, and has them arrange themselves into committees.  None of the projects were successful though.  This allowed Napoleon to inch in.

Napoleon was a better leader than Snowball in the sense that he surrounded himself with advisors, delegated work, and consolidated his power.  Almost from the beginning he took the puppies and trained them to be his security force.  He used Squealer as his spokesman.  He also began a campaign of misinformation about Snowball and eventually forced him out.

Napoleon was not a good leader because he was selfish.  However, he was a more successful leader than Snowball because Snowball was incompetent.  

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