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A Jury of Her Peers

by Susan Glaspell
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Who is the central character of "A Jury of Her Peers"?

The central character of "A Jury of her Peers" is Martha Hale, who shows Mrs. Wright that she has the support of the townspeople and understands her plight.

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The central or main character in writing is usually the one through whom the audience becomes involved in the unfolding events. Such a character often faces either an internal or external conflict that needs resolution. The figure can either decide to be steadfast and hold onto his or her resolve...

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The central or main character in writing is usually the one through whom the audience becomes involved in the unfolding events. Such a character often faces either an internal or external conflict that needs resolution. The figure can either decide to be steadfast and hold onto his or her resolve or change to solve the problem.

In the short story "A Jury of her Peers," by Susan Glaspell, Martha Hale is the conduit through which we learn about Minnie Foster's unfortunate circumstances. She is also the one who resolves the issue about Minnie's culpability by getting rid of evidence that might implicate her. She is, therefore, the main character.

Furthermore, the audience learns about all the other characters through Mrs. Hale's thoughts and observations, which further confirms her role as the central character. Mrs. Hale's actions, sentiments, and knowledge are crucial to our understanding and appreciation of the story.

In conclusion, all these aspects of Mrs. Hale involve the audience to such an extent that we develop sympathy for Minnie Wright and understand why she was driven to commit such a terrible crime. It seems that she had no choice but to do what she had done to rid herself of the outrageous abuse she suffered at the hands of her cruel husband.

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I was vaguely thinking of answering this question in a clever way by saying that Minnie Wright is the central character, even though she doesn't appear. However, I will go for the much more sensible answer of Martha Hale, who is the character that the story opens with. This is because it is Martha Hale who tells us more about the reality of Minnie Wright and her background, and how she changed being married to John Wright and suffering the isolation and loneliness that was part of her life. Note her comment on John Wright as a character:

"He didn't drink, and kept his word as well as most, I guess, and paid his debts. But he was a hard man, Mrs. Peters. Just to pass the time of day with him--." She stopped, shivered a little. "Like a raw wind that gets to the bone." Her eye fell upon the cage on the table before her, and she added, almost bitterly: "I should think she would've wanted a bird!"

Martha is important because of the way that she allows us to have a much fuller picture of the Wrights and the way that Minnie was transformed. Note also that she is the character who begins to remove any trace of evidence that could possibly be used to indicate that Minnie Wright was disturbed or suffering anxiety. This can be seen in the way that she re-sews the bad sewing that Minnie Wright did that was in such contrast to the rest of her neat sewing. Martha Hale therefore is the most important character because it is she that is used as the primary vehicle for expressing the theme of female solidarity and it is she that influences Mrs. Peters.

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