How can I write a design brief for my art?  What should I include in it?

2 Answers | Add Yours

vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I’m not an artist and I know nothing about design briefs, but I thought I would tackle your question for two reasons: (1) to learn something about which I am ignorant; and (2) to show how easy it is to learn these days thanks to the internet.

I therefore went to Google and began typing in the words “design brief for art.”  Before I could even finish typing this phrase, Google was already suggesting some other search possibilities, include “design brief template.”  In other words, Google was already suggesting some sites that would not only tell me how to prepare a design brief but would also show me how to do one.

The first article that popped up when I looked for “design brief for art” was a piece by David Airey:

http://www.davidairey.com/how-do-you-write-a-graphic-design-brief/

Airey begins by asserting that a design brief is necessary for two main reasons:

  • It ensures the client knows exactly what s/he wants to achieve from the project.
  • It acts as a point of reference for designers, forming the focus of their work.

The fact that Airey’s article is the first that appears suggests that it is especially relevant.  It is, however, also quite brief, so I recommend that you not stop there but do the same search I did and look for other relevant sites.

Among the links that came up when I searched for “design brief template” were these:

http://elise.com/web/tools/creativebrief.html

http://gettingattention.org/articles/197/planning-budgets/nonprofit-creative-brief-template.html

Please note design briefs may differ depending on the industry for which you are preparing them and/or the country in which you reside.  In case you are working in the United Kingdom, I’ve provided a link below to advice about preparing a design brief for British readers.

It’s also worth remembering that requirements in practically any field can change over time, so it’s always important to try to find the most recent and up-to-date information.  I would be suspicious, for instance, of any information that is more than ten years old, especially if more recent information is available.

Finally, I thought it might be interesting to search for “design brief sample.”  Here is one of the first links that turned up, and it looks especially helpful:

http://www.technologystudent.com/designpro/problem1.htm

You may want to repeat the search for “design brief sample” to see what else you can find, since this link may not be relevant to an artist.

Thanks for giving me this opportunity to learn about design briefs, which I had never even heard of before.  Thanks to you, I am a (slightly) smarter person now than I was 15 minutes ago!

 

 

arrellbelle's profile pic

arrellbelle | Student, College Sophomore | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

When I took art is elementary, middle, and high school, I had to write design briefs too and mostly it annoyed me because I already knew what I wanted to do, but over time, I got used to it because it became helpful, I can see where my train of thought is and where I should be able to make modifications. In a design brief, write about what you're making, why you're making it, how you're going to be making it, and any questions you need help answering.

We’ve answered 318,989 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question