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Bob is Sherri "Cherry" Valence's boyfriend.  He is also the Social that beat Johnny up. (We learn this through Ponyboys' retelling of the story the night of the movie). He drives a "tuff" blue Mustang, wears a lot of rings (a clue that tells us he was responsible for hurting Johnny), and likes to bully others. He directs another social to "give the kid a bath" in the scene at the park.  That social then pushes Ponyboys' head under the water in the fountain. 

Johnny, being scared from the first time he got jumped and worried that they are going to kill Pony, kills him by stabbing him.

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Bob Sheldon is the stereotypical Soc (Social) character in the book. He is rich, drives a cool blue Mustang, and his parents let him do whatever he wants. Bob really loves to push other people around, and wears heavy rings on his hands when he fights greasers so he can do more damage. Bob is the one who beat up Johnny so badly that he was terrified and started to carry a switchblade with him.

Randy is Bob’s best friend. However, Bob’s character never develops in maturity the way Randy does.

At the turning point of the story, Bob tries to drown Ponyboy and Johnny kills him.

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Bob is one of the Socs, and he is also the boyfriend of Cherry Valence. Through hints in the novel referring to the rings on his fingers, we know that he is the Soc who previously beat up Johnny. He is also the Soc that Johnny ends up killing because he was trying to drown Ponyboy in the park the night that Ponyboy and Johnny ran away.

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