While naratting the story describe how Tennyson has developed a picturous quality in the poem----"THE LADY OF SHALOTT"?You can include some of the lines of the poem to explain your answer properly...

While naratting the story describe how Tennyson has developed a picturous quality in the poem----"THE LADY OF SHALOTT"?

You can include some of the lines of the poem to explain your answer properly and so that your answer is properly understood by me or any of the readers.

Expert Answers
Doug Stuva eNotes educator| Certified Educator

This could just be my weak vocabulary, but I've never heard of the word picturous and neither have my two dictionaries.  I'll answer your question assuming you mean picturesque or filled with images or something of that sort. 

And the answer is simple:  Tennyson creates a picturesque poem with imagery

"The Lady of Shalott" is a narrative poem, or a poem that tells a story.  You could read any stanza and find it full of images.  Thus, the poem is full of images that involve the senses:  sight, yes, but also sound and touch.  Your question relates mostly to sight or visual imagery.

In stanza two, for instance, the island area is filled with white willows, and "aspens quiver,"  "little breezes dusk and shiver/Through the wave that runs forever/By the island in the river/Flowing down to Camelot."  These are visual images--flowers, wave, flowing river--with a little tactile/touch imagery included:  the breeze that blows. 

The island area is contrasted with Camelot:

Four gray walls, and four gray towers,

Overlook a space of flowers,...

The colorful island and river contrast with the gray of Camelot. 

Imagery gives concreteness to ideas.  The Lady sees Camelot only through her mirror, her art.  The reader sees the setting through imagery, similarly to how the lady sees Camelot--only through the images that she sees in the mirror and creates as she weaves.  The reader sees via the imagery of the speaker, however.  The contrast between color and gray is seen only by the reader.   

The Lady can never reach Camelot as she sees it, because that Camelot doesn't exist.  It isn't real or actual.  It exists as she knows it only in her art--her imagery. 

Read the study guide:
The Lady of Shalott

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question