While Macbeth was previously struck by guilt and shame, his soliloquy in act 3, scene 1 reflects different priorities. Compared to his previous soliloquies, how does it explain his change and development?

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In act 1, scene 7, Macbeth still clings to feelings of justice. He reflects that the assassination of a king would carry consequences and worries that "we still have judgment here." Macbeth fears that he will be forced to endure punishment for his misdeeds. He notes that justice is "even-handed"...

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In act 1, scene 7, Macbeth still clings to feelings of justice. He reflects that the assassination of a king would carry consequences and worries that "we still have judgment here." Macbeth fears that he will be forced to endure punishment for his misdeeds. He notes that justice is "even-handed" and that he would be "plagued" to endure the penalties of justice as a conviction for his crimes. Macbeth is able to recognize that his own "vaulting ambition" is out of control and that giving in to such unchecked desire could be disastrous.

His soliloquy in act 3, scene 1 demonstrates no such remorse for an overly ambitious spirit. Macbeth has transformed into a man who feels that he has risen above justice, noting that "there is none but [Banquo] / Whose being I do fear." He has become a victim of his own scheming, endlessly worrying about how the prophecy of the witches might impact him.

Because of the witches, Macbeth sees himself as "fruitless" and "barren" and is tormented by the fact that his kingship will not be transferred to anyone in his own family. Ambition now drives his every thought, and he is determined to challenge fate. Macbeth now believes that he has a right to be king, and he readies himself to defend his position against any threat. Banquo's "royalty of nature" conflicts with Macbeth's own moral decay; in the first scene of act 3, he demonstrates no sense of remorse or regret about achieving his goals at any cost.

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