Which type of irony is represented by the boy's dillusionment at the bazaar in James Joyce's "Araby"?a. verbal irony b. historical irony c. dramatic irony d. ironic contrast between romance and...

Which type of irony is represented by the boy's dillusionment at the bazaar in James Joyce's "Araby"?

a. verbal irony

b. historical irony

c. dramatic irony

d. ironic contrast between romance and reality

Asked on by ytterili

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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d. ironic contrast between romance and reality. 

Clearly, at the end of James Joyce's story "Araby," there is a sharp contrast (irony) between the narrator's anticipated wonder and excitement when he reaches the bazaar and his devastating disillusionment when he enters and finds only the trivial rather than the exotic. 

Before he goes to the Araby of his boyish mind, the narrator has created an image of a wondrous place with booths containing alluring and unique objects.  Instead, he enters a darkened building where the shopgirls engage in idle gossip. Bitter tears fill his eyes in his Joycian epiphany as he realizes how foolishly romantic his dreams of the girl whom he has idealized as almost a "holy grail" have been in contrast to the reality of the darkened and trivial bazaar.  Thus, the boy realizes the irony of his romantic dream:  The pursuit of the ideal is vain and unattainable.

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