Which tribe settled in Northumbria in 1066?

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The Normans of France -- though originally from Scandinavia, hence their name, derived from 'northmen' -- settled in Northumbria in 1066. 

William the Conqueror, also known as William of Normandy, insisted on settling Northumbria -- one of four major English kingdoms -- to protect his newly formed kingdom from Scottish...

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The Normans of France -- though originally from Scandinavia, hence their name, derived from 'northmen' -- settled in Northumbria in 1066. 

William the Conqueror, also known as William of Normandy, insisted on settling Northumbria -- one of four major English kingdoms -- to protect his newly formed kingdom from Scottish conquest. 

Ten sixty-six is the definitive year of the Norman Conquest. William the Conqueror and his army settled England, after defeating Harold during the Battle of Hastings, thereby establishing a French influence. This influence permeated everything, allowing for the establishment of a more developed courtly life, changes in cuisine, attention to landscaping and dining rituals, and permanent changes to the language, thereby transforming English from a Germanic tongue to one with both French and Germanic roots.

 

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