Which three lines in this excerpt from Elizabeth Bishop's "The Fish" show that the fish has given up struggling for survival after living a hard life?

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In lines 5 to 7, Bishop writes:

He didn't fightHe hadn't fought at allHe hung a grunting weight

Yet this fish she holds half out of the water is not a thing to be pitied but rather respected and admired in the same way one might admire a...

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In lines 5 to 7, Bishop writes:

He didn't fight
He hadn't fought at all
He hung a grunting weight

Yet this fish she holds half out of the water is not a thing to be pitied but rather respected and admired in the same way one might admire a soldier coming to the end of his life. He is not someone who has given up on life but is someone who has been in this situation so many times that he knows it would do him more harm than good to struggle.

As Bishop states:

from his lower lip . . . hung five old pieces of fish-line . . . with all their five big hooks grown firmly in his mouth.

Her respect grows stronger as she looks over his "battered" body and into his "sullen face." In a way she feels proud, a sense of "victory," that she has managed to catch such an old campaigner. The poem ends with Bishop throwing the fish back into the water and leaving it to fight another day.

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