Which three characters take action about prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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Three other characters who display racism in To Kill a Mockingbird are Mayella Ewell, Walter Cunningham Sr., and Calpurnia's adversary at her church, Lula.

Mayella's extreme loneliness drives her to request Tom Robinson to do a few chores for her, but she proves to be no friend. When she attacks...

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Three other characters who display racism in To Kill a Mockingbird are Mayella Ewell, Walter Cunningham Sr., and Calpurnia's adversary at her church, Lula.

Mayella's extreme loneliness drives her to request Tom Robinson to do a few chores for her, but she proves to be no friend. When she attacks Tom, a married man, kissing and groping him, Tom beats a haste retreat. But he is not fast enough to escape the prying eyes of Mayella's father, Bob, who beats Mayella for the indiscretion of "tempting a black man." Mayella shows her true colors in court, accusing Tom of assault and rape, and referring to him as a "nigger." The unfounded charges prove to be a death sentence for Tom.

Walter Cunningham Sr. is the father of Scout's school friend, Walter Jr. A poor farmer, he leads the group of men who plan to take Tom Robinson from the jail for a necktie party--a lynching. The arrival of the children, and especially Scout's innocent conversation, shames Cunningham from fulfilling his mission, and the men leave the jail, with Tom still safely inside.

Lula is the one black character in the novel who shows any outward trace of racism. She confronts Calpurnia outside the First Purchase Church and attempts to keep the Finch's housekeeper from entering with Jem and Scout. It is an all-black church, and Lula does not like the idea of having white children as a part of the congregation. Calpurnia stands up to her threatening words, Lula gets no support from the rest of the assemblage, and the children end up spending an enlightening day among Calpurnia's friends.

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