Which temperature is always larger, an object's Celsius temperature or its Kelvin temperature?

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There are three temperature scales currently in common use, the Kelvin scale, which is used primarily by scientists; the English or Fahrenheit scale, once common in the Anglosphere but now used almost exclusively in the United States; and the metric, Celsius or Centigrade scale, the most commonly used temperature scale...

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There are three temperature scales currently in common use, the Kelvin scale, which is used primarily by scientists; the English or Fahrenheit scale, once common in the Anglosphere but now used almost exclusively in the United States; and the metric, Celsius or Centigrade scale, the most commonly used temperature scale in the world for weather reporting and other aspects of everyday life.

The term centigrade refers to the fundamental unit of the scale, a degree, being one hundredth (1/100, centi-) of the difference between the freezing and boiling point of water, i.e. water freezes at 0° C and boils at 100° C.

The Kelvin scale uses the same size degrees as the Celsius scale but 0° K is absolute zero, the lowest theoretically possible temperature. Since the freezing point of water is 273.15° K, the temperature in degrees Kelvin is always 273.15°  higher than the temperature in Celsius.

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