Which of Sir Thomas Wyatt's poems speaks of escaping the corruption of King Henry?

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Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542) was a prolific poet in the early sixteenth century. He is credited with introducing the Italian (Petrarchan) sonnet to English literature. As your question suggests, however, Wyatt spent most of his adult life in the service of Henry VIII either as a courtier or a diplomat. He fell afoul of King Henry fairly early in his career.

Wyatt wrote two poems that explore the dangers and corruption of court life. One details his general discontent with life as a diplomat in Henry's service, "Mine own John Poynz," and one focuses on the consequences of belonging to Henry VIII's court, "Innocentia Veritas Viat Fides Circumdederunt me inimici mei." Of the two poems, the one that deals directly with Henry's court, and the consequences of living in it, is "Innocentia," loosely translated as "Innocence Truth (Wyatt) Honor--[despite these]--my enemies surround me," most likely an allusion to Psalms 16:9 ("My enemies surround my soul"). One of Wyatt's enduring works is his...

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